Pricing Table Particle

Quickly drive clicks-and-mortar catalysts for change
  • Basic
  • Standard Compliant Channels
  • $50
  • Completely synergize resource taxing relationships via premier market
  • 1 GB of space
  • Support at $25/hour
  • Sign Up
  • Premium
  • Standard Compliant Channels
  • $100
  • Completely synergize resource taxing relationships via premier market
  • 10 GB of space
  • Support at $15/hour
  • Sign Up
  • Platinum
  • Standard Compliant Channels
  • $250
  • Completely synergize resource taxing relationships via premier market
  • 30 GB of space
  • Support at $5/hour
  • Sign Up

The Slider™ Camera-Movement System In The News
David Suddaby Blog May 2016

BLOG: David Suddaby: Cinematography and Photography Production Blog
POSTED: May 6, 2016

Excerpt from "The 5 Best Camera Sliders, Ever." by David Suddaby:
#1 The Original Slider -- When price is absolutely no consideration and only the absolute best will do, the ‘Original’ is the Bugatti Veyron of camera sliders, bar none. This is the benchmark where all of the sliders are judged.... This slider, in my opinion is as close to perfection as you can achieve.... It is considerably light, yet rock solid. It can be mounted in any configuration imaginable and it is so smooth it glides any payload like ice on ice. The original Slider works better than any of its imitators by a wide margin. Sadly, very few rental houses stock these choosing to settle for inferior alternatives.  In the rare times I’ve had the privilege to use this slider, they’ve always been supplied by grips who personally own them.

Entertainment Weekly Cover October 2012

MAGAZINE: Entertainment Weekly
ISSUE: October 26, 2012

The Slider Featured in EW ArticlePhoto Caption:
"Cameraman Mike Satrazemis uses the Slider to go in for a close-up of 13-year-old Chandler Riggs."



ICG Cover June 2009

MAGAZINE: International Cinematographers Guild Magazine
ISSUE: June 2009
ARTICLE: "Motorized Slider"

Excerpt from the article:
I was recently challenged in a car spot by a shot of a badge that needed to start clean and resolve in a move across the grill ending in a heroic beauty shot of the logo," explains cinematographer Jeff Cronenweth, ASC. "Naturally we didn’t want to compromise our natural light, interfere with any interactive reflections or worry about seeing our camera in the shot. The Original Slider's 8-foot motorized unit was the answer. Not only is it directly attachable to the vehicle in order to reduce any potential stability issues, it afforded me the opportunity to effortlessly pan, tilt and slide laterally at will. It was the perfect solution to this complicated shot."

P3 Update October 2008 Cover

MAGAZINE: P3 Update
ISSUE: October 2008
ARTICLE: "Best Supporting Camera" by Nelson Jones

Excerpt from the article:
The Mini-Slider is another gizmo that is perfect for small camera adjustments...DP Robert F. Smith, who was also the B-camera operator on the Sarah Silverman Show, uses the Mini-Slider a great deal. ‘The Slider, they make the best unit out there as far as dependability. I’ve used other companies but it’s the ball bearings, the rigidness of the unit…just everything is done well,’ says Smith.

ICG Magazine Cover November 2007

MAGAZINE: International Cinematographers Guild Magazine
ISSUE: November 2007
ARTICLE: “Tips and Tools” by Pauline Rogers

Excerpt from the article:
Developed by key grip turned Steadicam operator Ron Veto and key grip Jerry Giacalone, The Slider Camera-Movement Systems are designed not to hamstring or handicap the cameraperson or grip. "It's made for rigging," explains Veto. "None of the 'sliders' out there at present are riggable. If you can't get it safely out on a ledge then what good is it?"
The Slider Camera-Movement SystemSliders range from The Mini (24 inches of travel and suitable for episodic television) to the eight-footer (84 inches of travel), which is great for car shoots and hard to get camera angles. In between, are the three, four, and six footers-from tight spots, on car mounts and even interior car shots. "You can shoot close-ups of toys, then strap on a crane arm and do full on arm swings of an insert car at full chase mode," says Veto. "We have two Sliders on The Sarah Silverman Show and couldn't operate without them. Making small corrections on the fly or pushing in to an extreme close-up is simple and quiet as well. To design shots like rigging to Condors or using as a quickly moveable car mount or just laying flat on a table to create dynamic movement that before was considered a big deal.
"It is also quiet, which makes the sound man happy.
"When we took it to the set of 24, it was like showing a newborn baby for the first time!"
Veto just returned from a Steadicam job on a commercial shoot in Denver and saw a Slider on the truck. "They are getting around," he says. "As a camera operator, we have the pressure to get the shot. Our reputations depend on a smooth shot. Sometimes there is no take two. We are only as good as our last shot. The Sliders make that easier, but sometimes more of a challenge. With the Slider, you don't have to rely on the dolly grip to fix or adjust, you decide when to move and to physically do it yourself."

AC 2006

MAGAZINE: American Cinematographer
ISSUE: June 1, 2006
ARTICLE: "Taking On Water" by David E. Williams

The Slider on PoseidonExcerpt from the article:
Each
 of Seale's
 Panavision
 units 
-
 Gold 
Ils, 
a
 Millennium, 
and 
assorted 
PanArris 
used 
in HydroFlex
 soft 
splash bags
 and
 hard 
underwater 
housings -
 was
 always 
fitted
 with 
a zoom 
and mounted 
on
 sliding
 plates [see Slider photo],
 dollies
 or 
cranes, 
allowing
 the 
respective
 operators 
to 
"follow 
the action 
or 
track
 out
 of 
trouble 
if
 they
 were 
picking 
up 
another
 unit 
correcting 
a 
dicey 
over-the-shoulder, 
all 
within 
the
 shot
 and
 under 
their 
control.
 This 
reminded
 me
 [John Seale] of 
a 
phrase 
Larry 
Kasdan coined
 while 
we 
were 
shooting 
Dreamcatcher 
[AC
April
 '03
]. 
In
 describing 
the 
coverage
 he wanted,
 he 
said,
 'The 
cameras
 are 
there
 by 
invitation, 
not 
by 
design.' 
That's
 the 
feel 
I
wanted
 on Poseidon
 as
 well,
 so 
I
 hammered 
my 
operators 
with 
that. 
I
 told
 them, 
'You
 haven't
 seen 
the 
walk-through;
 you 
haven't
 seen 
the 
rehearsal;
 you
 don't
 know 
what's
 going 
to 
happen.
 Now 
shoot,
 and be
 nervous
 about 
it! '
We 
wanted 
that
 with
 every
 take. 
I
 wanted
 the 
cameras 
to 
be 
nervous; 
I wanted 
them 
to 
track
 the 
action 
and
 seek 
out 
shots 
as 
opposed
 to
 designing 
them."

ICG Magazine Cover May 2006

MAGAZINE: International Cinematographers Guild Magazine
ISSUE: May 2006
ARTICLE: "Poseidon" by Bob Fisher

Excerpt from the article:

After the Poseidon is upside down, the main cameras were on slider plates and dollies with fluid heads that were used to create a rolling movement. [John] Seale explains that Peterson wants the audience to sense that the ship is unstable and could suddenly sink....
"The nervousness of the cameras moving on dollies and slider plates helped to create a claustrophobic feeling," Seale says.

It's The Original.